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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
of his skin was the main driver for nelson mandela as it was for civil rights leader here in the united states. there is a join and conjunction there. i think people in this country as dr. hill points out, had a special afint afinty for nelson mandela. >> you saw that, dr. hill, first hand. your organization transafrica played a pivotal role in the anti-apartheid movement. was mande mandela here in greatt to say "thank you" to the united states? >> yes he was here to say, "thank you" he had a very important agenda to present himself and the african national congress as kind of a political configuration that could assume state power and lead the nation through the non-apartheid era. that was a very important aspect to his visit. equally as important, however, was to have the kind of public support for mr. mandela and the organization and the public content and to have that public support that would out weigh the notion that they were. >> he himself said he didn't want to be known as a saint sai. if we go too far in bea beatifyg him that the message will be lost. we always have to be conc
, because the first weekend in july 50 years ago was when the civil rights act of 1964 was signed. >> wow. >> and so we will be back the first week in july 50 years later, and we will recommit ourselves to that purpose of that civil rights opportunity act. so we're excited. >> now, we got it's the 20th anniversary. it's going to be around voting 50 years after the civil rights act. but one thing that is always off the chain is the entertainment. but i said that there's no way you could beat last year because you had beyonce. but you did. we're announcing tonight you have prince next year. >> prince will headline our essence festival for 2014. he was our headliner ten years ago for the tenth anniversary, and he is back. we are honored, excited, and even more emboldened than ever that this will be the biggest party and will position us to achieve our purpose in 2014. >> as you look back as someone that wasn't around when essence was founded and you see where we are today in the midst of this is the middle of the second term of the first african-american president, you're hosting such a huge
in the southerners that fled after the passage of the civil rights act and precipitated the migration of the center of gravity in the republican party to the south. and you see this, you know, not just in the evolution of the elected officials in the party but also in polling of the attitudes of republicans, you know, republican voters. it's not an accident that the republican party said rosa parks has ended racism. because in polls you constantly see the majorities of republican voters and conservative voters believe that the real discrimination in this country is against white people and that kind of all structural racism had been eradicated. this wasn't a slip of the tongue as much as it was the accidentally revealing a basic tenant of conservative thought. >> i politely disagree with michelle. i don't know what poll that is. i would love to get the site of the polls that are saying that a vast majority of republicans view that there's reverse discrimination. and there's more white persons being discriminated against in this country and that's the real racism. certainly that was not the party th
, they weren't violating people's civil rights or privacy and it was a program carefully monitored and it is unfortunate the only person we have now to defend it is the president but nobody trusts him. he didn't know about the irs. >> do you believe that? >> i find it hard to believe. >> which is worse that he didn't know or he did know and he lied? >> i think the latter. i think -- i don't know how many times s you can say i didn't know about that. the president of the united states, on issues that big, on benghazi for example and the irs scandal, i think those are things that if he doesn't know about he has an incompetent staff or given instructions he doesn't want to know. but the idea he didn't know about what was going on strikes me as just not credible. >> all right. i'll have more of our special chat with former vice president dick cheney tonight at 8:00 p.m. you might be surprise who is impressing him in the early presidential sweepstakes. it is not necessarily a certain governor in the state of new jersey. who is and who isn't, his struggle right now, his daughters are fig
. ♪ >>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
to know about american politics. fascinated by the american civil rights movement. martha: i think that is such an important point that you make about him and he was, he was sort of regal. he had a very regal bearing and yet he was humble which is such a great combination. >> awesome. i was remembering that when he came to the 50th anniversary of the united nations opening in new york, all the world leaders were around obviously and yet somehow mandela stood out as a leader among leaders because they all flocked to him. they all wanted photos with him shaking hands. i got to go over, i was like, it was unbelievable that the world leaders were almost like, tell us your secret. how did you do this? martha: yeah. and think one of the secrets was that he put everything before himself and that he was such a strong man and who was able to be, you know, in the face of that moment, was able to bring people together, much the way abraham lincoln did during the civil war period in the united states, to wrench the two sides back together for belief in a greater nation. >> wow, that was terrif
as a spoil of war, you helped return the art to its rightful owners. >> unique in the history of civilization. >> reporter: no country had ever done that before. >> they supervised the return of 5 million, 5 million stolen objects to the countries from which these things were taken. >> reporter: paintings were returned to museums. >> there it is. >> reporter: works you can see today. >> parc monceau. this claude monet painting is one at the new york metropolitan museum of art along with this van goyen landscape and soap bubbles. hitler wants this one. >> he wants the best of the best of the things he decides are the best. >> reporter: the nazis not only stole from museums but also from thousands of families. to recover the possessions including the artwork of families just like yours must have really connected with you? >> absolutely. i ended up being able to come along and recover my grandfather's collection of 3,000 prints, some of them are hanging in my apartment right now. >> reporter: this was rye of works stolen by the nazis have still never been f like rafael's portrait of a young man.
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)